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AuthorPramsohler, Stephandc.contributor.author
Date of accession2018-06-05T12:43:12Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2018-06-05T12:43:12Zdc.date.available
Year of creation2017dc.date.created
Date of first publication2018-06-05dc.date.issued
AbstractBackground: The benefits of training in hypoxic environments are widely discussed. Several interventional studies prove its usefulness for different applications. Lately the impact of hypoxia on pre-existing health conditions in middle aged and elderly populations has come into focus. Especially the potential of hypoxic training in reducing the workload during endurance training could withhold great benefits for orthopedically impaired populations like geriatric patients. Furthermore, several studies show beneficial effects of hypoxic training on cardiovascular risk factors and blood perfusion in muscles. This study compound aims at the investigation of physiological effects and potential benefits of hypoxic training interventions in the elderly. Methods: Three studies and one review are supposed to give an overview of physiological effects and the usability of hypoxia as additive for endurance training in the elderly. Study A evaluates the effects of a commonly practiced hiking prevention program on cardiovascular risk factors in 24 elderly subjects (10 female, age 66.2 ± 4.4 years and 14 male, age 65.6 ± 2.7 years). Study B and C identify possible obstacles and risks when planning rehabilitation or prevention programs in NH. Study B shows the main differences between NH and HH comparing the physiological effects in six subjects (age 28.3 ± 8.2 years) during a “real” and a simulated hike. Meanwhile, paper C gives an overview of possible risks and especially the impact of prolonged hypoxia exposure and its potential impact on cognitive functions. Finally, in Study D, 40 geriatric patients (NG: n = 16, age 82.0 ±7.8 years, HG: n = 19, age 80.2 ± 7.2 years) participated in a single blinded, placebo controlled interventional study, investigating the potential reduction of physical workload during endurance training using NH and its physiological effects. Results: Only one hiking session per week over a time course of nine months does not lower cardiovascular risk factors in subjects older than 60 years. Systolic blood pressure seems to be lowered only in patients with pathological or borderline values. For prevention- or rehabilitation programs, using normobaric hypoxia, some differences have to be taken into account. In NH, heartrate is lower while peripheral oxygen saturation is higher maintaining a similar physical strain as in HH (p < 0.05). Furthermore, NH seems to impair cognitive reaction time after sleep to a certain degree. Physical workload (Watt/kg p = 0.012) and related parameters are significantly reduced in a three week interventional endurance training study on simulated 3000 m in the elderly. Discussion: NH training lowers physical workload during endurance training in the elderly. Especially for geriatric rehabilitation, where patients and their therapists have only three weeks and rather short training sessions for measurable improvements, NH has great benefits. Furthermore, it seems to provide a safe environment and allows better monitoring than HH for prevention- or rehabilitation programs. Cardiac and pulmonary demands are lower in NH compared to HH. Overnight stays in hypoxia bear some risk for cognitive impairment, which has to be taken into account as possible risk for accidents. Nevertheless, we think during normal daytime training sessions and in quite low altitudes, this is no limiting factor for preventive- or rehabilitative programs. The common hiking routine of only one hiking session per week, practiced by most elderly, seems not to be sufficient to improve cardiovascular fitness. Therefore, the search for new possibilities to use the benefits of hypoxia for this age group is of importance. Conclusion: Training in hypoxic environments bears a lot of potential for certain patient groups. Especially the use of NH as additive to endurance training either to lower physical workload or to enhance the training intensity seems to be promising. This also could open the field of low volume high intensity training for geriatrics.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
Has partDOI: 10.1007/s00391-014-0622-0dc.relation.haspart
Has partDOI: 10.3389/fphys.2017.00081dc.relation.haspart
Has partDOI: 10.1055/s-0042-121964dc.relation.haspart
Has partDOI: 10.3389/fphys.2017.00514dc.relation.haspart
LicenseStandarddc.rights
Link to license texthttps://oparu.uni-ulm.de/xmlui/license_v3dc.rights.uri
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 610 / Medicine & healthdc.subject.ddc
MeSHHypoxiadc.subject.mesh
MeSHGeriatricsdc.subject.mesh
MeSHAltitude sickness; Prevention & controldc.subject.mesh
MeSHAltitude sickness; Rehabilitationdc.subject.mesh
MeSHPhysical endurancedc.subject.mesh
TitlePhysiological effects of training in hypoxic environments and its benefits for prevention and rehabilitationdc.title
Resource typeDissertationdc.type
Date of acceptance2018-04-27dcterms.dateAccepted
RefereeNetzer, Nikolaus Christophdc.contributor.referee
RefereeHögel, Josefdc.contributor.referee
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-6830dc.identifier.doi
PPN1024817598dc.identifier.ppn
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-6887-3dc.identifier.urn
GNDHypoxiedc.subject.gnd
GNDGeriatriedc.subject.gnd
GNDTrainingdc.subject.gnd
FacultyMedizinische Fakultätuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionUKU. Institut für Humangenetikuulm.affiliationSpecific
Grantor of degreeMedizinische Fakultätuulm.thesisGrantor
DCMI TypeTextuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
In cooperation withHermann Buhl Institut für Hypoxie- und Schlafmedizinforschunguulm.cooperation
Bibliographyuulmuulm.bibliographie


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