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AuthorWildt, Miriamdc.contributor.author
Date of accession2016-03-14T13:39:07Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2016-03-14T13:39:07Zdc.date.available
Year of creation2004dc.date.created
AbstractPersistent proliferation occurs among the local (cluster 9) and projection (cluster 10) neurons in the lobster brain. Serotonin influences the rate of neurogenesis in these cell clusters. Neurogenesis among the cluster 10 projection neurons is also under circadian control. Because serotonin and the light/dark cycle influence the rate of neurogenesis, experiments conducted for this thesis have tested whether serotonin may be part of the circadian pathway regulating neurogenesis. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements of serotonin levels in the brains of juvenile lobsters exposed to a 12:12 light: dark cycle, followed by 3 days in constant darkness, demonstrate that serotonin levels in the brain follow an endogenous rhythm that can be entrained by light; that separate rhythms can be found in functionally distinct lobes; that phase shifted entrained feeding alters the endogenous rhythm of both neurogenesis and serotonin; that feeding frozen brine prior to sampling decreases the characteristic peak and troughs of the circadian rhythm of both neurogenesis and serotonin; that physical activity shortly increases the rate of neurogenesis but overall decreases neurogenesis; that physical activity phase shifts the circadian rhythm of serotonin; and that feeding functions as a stronger synchronizer on both neurogenesis and serotonin than light. Immunocytochemical staining methods examining the intensity of serotonin labelling in the brain over 24-h support the HPLC findings; show that melatonin, a biosynthetic product of serotonin which has been implicated to modify the release and synthesis of serotonin in other species, can be found throughout various sites within the lobster brain; and that serotonin transporter (SERT) expressing cells can be found within the region of life-long neurogenesis and adjacent to newly generated cells. Taken together, these results provide evidence that serotonin may function as one component of a light-/feeding-regulated molecular pathway influencing neurogenesis of the cluster 10 projection neurons. Supported by LGF Baden-Württemberg, DAAD, NSF, Staley Fellowship and Klothilde Eberhardt Stiftung.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
LicenseStandard (Fassung vom 03.05.2003)dc.rights
Link to license texthttps://oparu.uni-ulm.de/xmlui/license_v1dc.rights.uri
KeywordHomarus americanusdc.subject
KeywordLife-long neurogenesisdc.subject
KeywordSerotonin transporter (SERT)dc.subject
LCSHChromatography, high pressure liquiddc.subject.lcsh
LCSHCircadian rhythmdc.subject.lcsh
LCSHHigh performance liquid chromatographydc.subject.lcsh
LCSHImmunocytochemistrydc.subject.lcsh
LCSHLobstersdc.subject.lcsh
LCSHMelatonindc.subject.lcsh
LCSHSerotonindc.subject.lcsh
MeSHFeedingdc.subject.mesh
TitleThe impact of day, night and other external synchronizers on brain serotonin levels in the American lobster Homarus americanusdc.title
Resource typeDissertationdc.type
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-413dc.identifier.doi
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-vts-49821dc.identifier.urn
FacultyFakultät für Naturwissenschaftenuulm.affiliationGeneral
Date of activation2005-01-03T10:10:31Zuulm.freischaltungVTS
Peer reviewneinuulm.peerReview
Shelfmark print versionZ: J-H 10.602 ; W: W-H 7.961 ; ZAV: J-H 9.394uulm.shelfmark
DCMI TypeTextuulm.typeDCMI
VTS-ID4982uulm.vtsID
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
University Bibliographyjauulm.unibibliographie


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