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AuthorGihring, Adriandc.contributor.author
AuthorGärtner, Fabiandc.contributor.author
AuthorSchirmer, Melaniedc.contributor.author
AuthorWabitsch, Martindc.contributor.author
AuthorKnippschild, Uwedc.contributor.author
Date of accession2022-05-23T09:37:32Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2022-05-23T09:37:32Zdc.date.available
Date of first publication2022-04-29dc.date.issued
AbstractThe urgency to investigate trauma in a controlled and reproducible environment rises since multiple trauma still account for the most deaths for people under the age of 45. The most common multiple trauma include head as well as blunt thorax trauma along with fractures. However, these trauma remain difficult to treat, partially because the molecular mechanisms that trigger the immediate immune response are not fully elucidated. To illuminate these mechanisms, investigators have used animal models, primarily mice as research subjects. This mini review aims to 1) emphasize the importance of the development of clinically relevant murine trauma research, 2) highlight and discuss the existing conflict between simulating clinically relevant situations and elucidating molecular mechanisms, 3) describe the advantages and disadvantages of established mouse trauma models developed to simulate clinically relevant situations, 4) summarize and list established mouse models in the field of trauma research developed to simulate clinically relevant situations.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
LicenseCC BY 4.0 Internationaldc.rights
Link to license texthttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/dc.rights.uri
KeywordMousedc.subject
KeywordModeldc.subject
KeywordClinic relevancedc.subject
KeywordImmune responsedc.subject
KeywordTranslatabilitydc.subject
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 610 / Medicine & healthdc.subject.ddc
MeSHWounds and injuriesdc.subject.mesh
MeSHModels, Animaldc.subject.mesh
MeSHMicedc.subject.mesh
MeSHImmunitydc.subject.mesh
TitleRecent developments in mouse trauma research models: a mini-reviewdc.title
Resource typeWissenschaftlicher Artikeldc.type
VersionpublishedVersiondc.description.version
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-43186dc.identifier.doi
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-43262-3dc.identifier.urn
GNDTaumadc.subject.gnd
GNDTiermodelldc.subject.gnd
GNDMausdc.subject.gnd
GNDImmunreaktiondc.subject.gnd
InstitutionUKU. Klinik für Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgieuulm.affiliationSpecific
InstitutionUKU. Klinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizinuulm.affiliationSpecific
Peer reviewjauulm.peerReview
DCMI TypeTextuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
Source - Title of sourceFrontiers in Physiologysource.title
Source - Place of publicationFrontiers Mediasource.publisher
Source - Volume13source.volume
Source - Year2022source.year
Source - Article number866617.source.articleNumber
Source - eISSN1664-042Xsource.identifier.eissn
Open AccessGreen Published, golduulm.OA
WoS000796379900001uulm.identifier.wos
Bibliographyuulmuulm.bibliographie
DFG project uulmSFB 1149 Teilprojekt B04 / Die Rolle schwerer Fettleibigkeit bei der Heilung von Muskelverletzungen / DFG / 251293561uulm.projectDFG
DFG project uulmGSC 270 / IGradU / Internationale Graduiertenschule für Molekulare Medizin Ulm (IGradU) / DFG / 53244728uulm.projectDFG


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