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AuthorPramsohler, Stephandc.contributor.author
AuthorBurtscher, Martindc.contributor.author
AuthorKiderlen, Martin Jobstdc.contributor.author
AuthorGatterer, Hannesdc.contributor.author
AuthorRausch, Lindadc.contributor.author
AuthorEliasson, Arndc.contributor.author
AuthorNetzer, Nikolaus C.dc.contributor.author
Date of accession2021-11-29T09:38:10Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2021-11-29T09:38:10Zdc.date.available
Date of first publication2017-07-20dc.date.issued
AbstractRationale: Evidence suggests that training in hypoxia can be very effective even while requiring less physical effort. We therefore aimed to measure the effect of endurance training under hypoxic conditions on pulmonary and cardiovascular parameters in an elderly population undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Methods: Forty patients over age 65 years with multiple co-morbid conditions were recruited during a 3-week stay in a geriatric rehabilitation center. Using a randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled design, patients were assigned to a hypoxic (HG) or normoxic (NG) group. HG patients completed seven training sessions of 30 min duration on a treadmill in a normobaric chamber with inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) of 15.27%, with 10–30 min active training. Training was conducted with target heart rate at 80% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2-peak). NG group performed similar training in sham hypoxia (room air or FiO2 = 20.94%). At pre- and post-test completion, measures included: (1) cycle ergometry with ECG monitoring and measurement of VO2-peak, and (2) echocardiography for ejection fraction. Results: The physical effort required of patients to reach target heart rate was reduced significantly (−28%, p = 0.043) in the HG compared to NG. Cardiopulmonary parameters showed no differences between groups. Conclusion: Endurance training at 3,000 meters elevation imposes less stress on the locomotor systems while resulting in a similar physiological strain (i.e., heart rate). Hypoxic training holds promise for successful geriatric rehabilitation by being more accommodating to physical limitations in geriatric patients. Trial registration: Registration at DRKS. (Approval No. 359/12, Trial No. DRKS00005241).dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
LicenseCC BY 4.0 Internationaldc.rights
Link to license texthttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/dc.rights.uri
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 610 / Medicine & healthdc.subject.ddc
MeSHAgeddc.subject.mesh
MeSHHypoxiadc.subject.mesh
MeSHPhysical endurancedc.subject.mesh
MeSHPhysical education and trainingdc.subject.mesh
TitleEndurance training in normobaric hypoxia imposes less physical stress for geriatric rehabilitationdc.title
Resource typeWissenschaftlicher Artikeldc.type
SWORD Date2019-12-19T17:56:11Zdc.date.updated
VersionpublishedVersiondc.description.version
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-40028dc.identifier.doi
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-40104-8dc.identifier.urn
GNDAlter <60-90 Jahre>dc.subject.gnd
GNDHypoxiedc.subject.gnd
GNDKörperliche Aktivitätdc.subject.gnd
GNDAusdauertestdc.subject.gnd
FacultyMedizinische Fakultätuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionUKU. Klinik für Innere Medizin IIuulm.affiliationSpecific
Peer reviewjauulm.peerReview
DCMI TypeCollectionuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
In cooperation withHermann Buhl Institut, Bad Aiblinguulm.cooperation
In cooperation withUniversität Innsbruckuulm.cooperation
In cooperation withUniversity of Health Sciences, United Statesuulm.cooperation
DOI of original publication10.3389/fphys.2017.00514dc.relation1.doi
Source - Title of sourceFrontiers in Physiologysource.title
Source - Place of publicationFrontiers Mediasource.publisher
Source - Volume8source.volume
Source - Year2017source.year
Source - Article number514source.articleNumber
Source - eISSN1664-042Xsource.identifier.eissn
Bibliographyuulmuulm.bibliographie


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