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AuthorScholl, Annikadc.contributor.author
AuthorSassenrath, Claudiadc.contributor.author
AuthorSassenberg, Kaidc.contributor.author
Date of accession2021-09-14T06:20:55Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2021-09-14T06:20:55Zdc.date.available
Date of first publication2015-04-07dc.date.issued
AbstractDepending on their motivation, individuals prefer different group contexts for social interactions. The present research sought to provide more insight into this relationship. More specifically, we tested how challenge/threat and a promotion/prevention focus predict attraction to groups with high- or low-power. As such, we examined differential outcomes of threat and prevention focus as well as challenge and promotion focus that have often been regarded as closely related. According to regulatory focus, individuals should prefer groups that they expect to “feel right” for them to join: Low-power groups should be more attractive in a prevention (than a promotion) focus, as these groups suggest security-oriented strategies, which fit a prevention focus. High-power groups should be more attractive in a promotion (rather than a prevention) focus, as these groups are associated with promotion strategies fitting a promotion focus (Sassenberg et al., 2007). In contrast, under threat (vs. challenge), groups that allow individuals to restore their (perceived) lack of control should be preferred: Low-power groups should be less attractive under threat (than challenge) because they provide low resources which threatened individuals already perceive as insufficient and high-power groups might be more attractive under threat (than under challenge), because their high resources allow individuals to restore control. Two experiments (N = 140) supported these predictions. The attractiveness of a group often depends on the motivation to engage in what fits (i.e., prefer a group that feels right in the light of one’s regulatory focus). However, under threat the striving to restore control (i.e., prefer a group allowing them to change the status quo under threat vs. challenge) overrides the fit effect, which may in turn guide individuals’ behavior in social interactions.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
LicenseCC BY 4.0 Internationaldc.rights
Link to license texthttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/dc.rights.uri
Keywordchallengedc.subject
Keywordgroupsdc.subject
Keywordsocial powerdc.subject
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 150 / Psychologydc.subject.ddc
LCSHRegulatory focus (Psychology)dc.subject.lcsh
LCSHThreatdc.subject.lcsh
MeSHPower, Psychologicaldc.subject.mesh
TitleAttracted to power: challenge/threat and promotion/prevention focus differentially predict the attractiveness of group powerdc.title
Resource typeWissenschaftlicher Artikeldc.type
SWORD Date2019-12-19T17:54:43Zdc.date.updated
VersionpublishedVersiondc.description.version
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-38795dc.identifier.doi
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-38871-9dc.identifier.urn
GNDBedrohungdc.subject.gnd
FacultyFakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften, Informatik und Psychologieuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionInstitut für Psychologie und Pädagogikuulm.affiliationSpecific
Peer reviewjauulm.peerReview
DCMI TypeCollectionuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
In cooperation withEberhard Karls Universität Tübingenuulm.cooperation
DOI of original publication10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00397dc.relation1.doi
Source - Title of sourceFrontiers in Psychologysource.title
Source - Place of publicationFrontiers Mediasource.publisher
Source - Volume6source.volume
Source - Year2015source.year
Source - Article number397source.articleNumber
Source - eISSN1664-1078source.identifier.eissn
Bibliographyuulmuulm.bibliographie


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