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AuthorFleischer, Ramonadc.contributor.author
AuthorRisely, Alicedc.contributor.author
AuthorHoeck, Paquita E. A.dc.contributor.author
AuthorKeller, Lukasdc.contributor.author
AuthorSommer, Simonedc.contributor.author
Date of accession2021-07-21T15:16:15Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2021-07-21T15:16:15Zdc.date.available
Date of first publication2020-10-27dc.date.issued
AbstractThe gut microbiome of animals, which serves important functions but can also contain potential pathogens, is to varying degrees under host genetic control. This can generate signals of phylosymbiosis, whereby gut microbiome composition matches host phylogenetic structure. However, the genetic mechanisms that generate phylosymbiosis and the scale at which they act remain unclear. Two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses are that phylosymbiosis is driven by immunogenetic regions such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) controlling microbial composition, or by spatial structuring of neutral host genetic diversity via founder effects, genetic drift, or isolation by distance. Alternatively, associations between microbes and host phylogeny may be generated by their spatial autocorrelation across landscapes, rather than the direct effects of host genetics. In this study, we collected MHC, microsatellite, and gut microbiome data from separate individuals belonging to the Galápagos mockingbird species complex, which consists of four allopatrically distributed species. We applied multiple regression with distance matrices and Bayesian inference to test for correlations between average genetic and microbiome similarity across nine islands for which all three levels of data were available. Clustering of individuals by species was strongest when measured with microsatellite markers and weakest for gut microbiome distributions, with intermediate clustering of MHC allele frequencies. We found that while correlations between island-averaged gut microbiome composition and both microsatellite and MHC dissimilarity existed across species, these relationships were greatly weakened when accounting for geographic distance. Overall, our study finds little support for large-scale control of gut microbiome composition by neutral or adaptive genetic regions across closely related bird phylogenies, although this does not preclude the possibility that host genetics shapes gut microbiome at the individual level.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
Relationhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1002%2Fece3.6934&file=ece36934-sup-0003-TableS2.xlsxdc.relation
LicenseCC BY 4.0 Internationaldc.rights
Link to license texthttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/dc.rights.uri
KeywordHost–microbe interactionsdc.subject
KeywordWildlife geneticsdc.subject
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 570 / Life sciencesdc.subject.ddc
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 590 / Animals (Zoology)dc.subject.ddc
LCSHBiogeographydc.subject.lcsh
LCSHMajor histocompatibility complexdc.subject.lcsh
LCSHMicrosatellites (Genetics)dc.subject.lcsh
MeSHHost Microbial Interactionsdc.subject.mesh
TitleMechanisms governing avian phylosymbiosis: genetic dissimilarity based on neutral and MHC regions exhibits little relationship with gut microbiome distributions of Galápagos mockingbirdsdc.title
Resource typeWissenschaftlicher Artikeldc.type
VersionpublishedVersiondc.description.version
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-38303dc.identifier.doi
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-38379-0dc.identifier.urn
GNDBiogeografiedc.subject.gnd
GNDMHCdc.subject.gnd
GNDMimusdc.subject.gnd
FacultyFakultät für Naturwissenschaftenuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionInstitut für Evolutionsökologie und Naturschutzgenomikuulm.affiliationSpecific
Peer reviewjauulm.peerReview
DCMI TypeTextuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
In cooperation withUniversität Zürichuulm.cooperation
DOI of original publication10.1002/ece3.6934dc.relation1.doi
Source - Title of sourceEcology and Evolutionsource.title
Source - Place of publicationWiley Open Accesssource.publisher
Source - Volume10source.volume
Source - Issue23source.issue
Source - Year2020source.year
Source - From page13345source.fromPage
Source - To page13354source.toPage
Source - eISSN2045-7758source.identifier.eissn
FundingDEAL-Projektuulm.funding
Bibliographyuulmuulm.bibliographie
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