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AuthorBeckmann, Sabrina Katharinadc.contributor.author
AuthorHiete, Michaeldc.contributor.author
AuthorBeck, Christophdc.contributor.author
Date of accession2021-07-09T11:15:53Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2021-07-09T11:15:53Zdc.date.available
Date of first publication2021-02-19dc.date.issued
AbstractAs climate change progresses, it is causing more frequent and severe heat waves, resulting in higher indoor temperatures. Various temperature thresholds for indicating indoor overheating have been proposed in different contexts, extending from reduced comfort in buildings to subjective heat stress and onset of first or serious health problems. This study reviews these thresholds and identifies threshold values for subjective heat stress of occupants in the city of Augsburg, Germany, distinguishing between vulnerable and non-vulnerable households. Survey data from 427 private households are analysed using unpaired analysis of variances (ANOVA), ttests and regression analysis to identify factors related to subjective heat stress at home during night-time. The findings imply that health implications during heat waves, age, local climate zones favouring the urban heat island effect and higher indoor temperature represent significant factors for subjective heat stress. A significant difference in subjective heat stress among different groups related to temperature could be identified for thresholds of 24.8 ◦C (people living alone) and 26.7 ◦C (people with chronic disease). As WHO threshold for health risk from overheating is 24 ◦C, people are apparently at heat-related risk without feeling that they are at risk, especially when they have chronic diseases; thus they may not see the urgency of taking adaptation measures.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
LicenseCC BY-NC-ND 4.0 Internationaldc.rights
Link to license texthttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/dc.rights.uri
KeywordHeat stressdc.subject
KeywordSummer temperaturedc.subject
KeywordVulnerabilitydc.subject
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 570 / Life sciencesdc.subject.ddc
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 610 / Medicine & healthdc.subject.ddc
LCSHHeat Physiological effectdc.subject.lcsh
LCSHHeat waves (Meteorology)dc.subject.lcsh
LCSHUrban heat islanddc.subject.lcsh
TitleThreshold temperatures for subjective heat stress in urban apartments — Analysing nocturnal bedroom temperatures during a heat wave in Germanydc.title
Resource typeWissenschaftlicher Artikeldc.type
VersionpublishedVersiondc.description.version
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-38190dc.identifier.doi
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-38266-9dc.identifier.urn
GNDVerwundbarkeitdc.subject.gnd
FacultyFakultät für Naturwissenschaftenuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionInstitut für Theoretische Chemieuulm.affiliationSpecific
Peer reviewjauulm.peerReview
DCMI TypeTextuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
In cooperation withUniversität Augsburguulm.cooperation
DOI of original publicationdoi.org/10.1016/j.crm.2021.100286dc.relation1.doi
Source - Title of sourceClimate Risk Managementsource.title
Source - Place of publicationElseviersource.publisher
Source - Volume32source.volume
Source - Year2021source.year
Source - Article number100286source.articleNumber
Source - eISSN2212-0963source.identifier.eissn
Bibliographyuulmuulm.bibliographie


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