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AuthorRietzler, Michaeldc.contributor.author
Date of accession2020-07-02T07:58:25Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2020-07-02T07:58:25Zdc.date.available
Year of creation2019dc.date.created
Date of first publication2020-07-02dc.date.issued
AbstractVirtual Reality (VR) has found its way into the households of end users and into many areas of industry. Current VR headsets as well as control devices are tracked by sensors in three-dimensional space and movements are transmitted into the virtual world in real time. This way, users can move freely and interact naturally with the digital world. However, the interaction always takes place in both worlds. However, each action performed by the user for the virtual world also has an effect on the real world. For example, every step a user takes in the virtual world is also executed in reality. But reality and virtuality are usually not the same. While the dimensions of the virtual world can be arbitrarily large, the space in reality is mostly limited by walls or other objects. Therefore, virtual objects are not physically present and real objects do not find a visual counterpart in the virtual world. This leads to challenges in the areas of locomotion and haptics. On the one hand, a conceptually endless virtual world is to be explored within the physical boundaries of the real world. On the other hand, virtual objects without corresponding hardware lose their physical properties because they have no physical counterpart. In this dissertation, a model of interaction in virtual worlds is presented, which takes into account both human perception and the real world. Furthermore, a continuum for input and output is derived, which considers in five categories from real to virtual different levels of abstraction from reality. A special category is the abstract real one, which is oriented towards reality, but deviates noticeably from it. Own works from the fields of locomotion and haptics, as well as an example of a purely virtual output modality are described under consideration of the presented continuum. The aim of this work is to show a decoupling of reality and virtuality as an elementary component of interaction in virtual worlds. The proposed continuum, as well as the presented abstract real interaction category should serve as an orientation aid to create interactions in VR.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Florian Geiselhart, and Enrico Rukzio. “The Matrix Has You: Realizing Slow Motion in Full-body Virtual Reality.” In: Proceedings of the 23rd ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology. VRST ’17. Gothenburg, Sweden: ACM, 2017, 2:1–2:10. isbn: 978-1-4503-5548-3. doi: 10.1145/3139131.3139145. url:http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3139131.3139145.dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Katrin Plaumann, Taras Kränzle, Marcel Erath, Alexander Stahl, and Enrico Rukzio. “VaiR: Simulating 3D Airflows in Virtual Reality.” In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. CHI ’17. Denver, Colorado, USA: ACM, 2017, pp. 5669–5677. isbn: 978-1-4503-4655-9. doi: 10.1145/3025453.3026009. url: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3025453.3026009.dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Florian Geiselhart, Jan Gugenheimer, and Enrico Rukzio. “Breaking the Tracking: Enabling Weight Perception Using Perceivable Tracking Offsets.” In: Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. CHI ’18. Montreal QC, Canada: ACM, 2018, 128:1–128:12. isbn: 978-1-4503-5620-6. doi: 10.1145/3173574.3173702. url: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3173574.3173702.dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Florian Geiselhart, Julian Frommel, and Enrico Rukzio. “Conveying the Perception of Kinesthetic Feedback in Virtual Reality Using State-of-the-Art Hardware.” In: Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. CHI ’18. Montreal QC, Canada: ACM, 2018, 460:1–460:13. isbn: 978-1-4503-5620-6. doi: 10.1145/3173574.3174034. url: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3173574.3174034.dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Jan Gugenheimer, Teresa Hirzle, Martin Deubzer, Eike Langbehn, and Enrico Rukzio. “Rethinking Redirected Walking: On the Use of Curvature Gains Beyond Perceptual Limitations and Revisiting Bending Gains.” In: 2018 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR). Oct. 2018, pp. 115–122. doi: 10.1109/ISMAR.2018.00041. url: http://https://doi.org/10. 1109/ISMAR.2018.00041.dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Teresa Hirzle, Jan Gugenheimer, Julian Frommel, Thomas Dreja, and Enrico Rukzio. “VRSpinning: Exploring the Design Space of a 1D Rotation Platform to Increase the Perception of Self-Motion in VR.” In: Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference. DIS ’18. Hong Kong, China: ACM, 2018, pp. 99–108. isbn: 978-1-4503-5198-0. doi: 10.1145/3196709.3196755. url: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3196709.3196755.dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Martin Deubzer, Dreja Thomas, and Enrico Rukzio. “Telewalk: Towards Free and Endless Walking in Room-Scale Virtual Reality.” In: Proc. of CHI 2020 (SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems). doi: 10.1145/3313831.3376821. url: https://doi.org/10.1145/3313831.3376821.dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Michael Rietzler, Gabriel Haas, Thomas Dreja, Florian Geiselhart, and Enrico Rukzio. “Virtual Muscle Force: Communicating Kinesthetic Forces Through Pseudo-Haptic Feedback and Muscle Input.” In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology. UIST ’19. New Orleans, LA, USA: Association for Computing Machinery, 2019, pp. 913–922. isbn: 9781450368162. doi: 10.1145/3332165.3347871. url: https://doi.org/10.1145/3332165.3347871.dc.relation.haspart
LicenseStandarddc.rights
Link to license texthttps://oparu.uni-ulm.de/xmlui/license_v3dc.rights.uri
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 004 / Data processing & computer sciencedc.subject.ddc
LCSHVirtual realitydc.subject.lcsh
LCSHHuman-computer interactiondc.subject.lcsh
LCSHHaptic devicesdc.subject.lcsh
TitlePhysical and virtual worlds : towards interaction in distinct realitiesdc.title
Resource typeDissertationdc.type
Date of acceptance2019-07-10dcterms.dateAccepted
RefereeRukzio, Enricodc.contributor.referee
RefereeSteinicke, Frankdc.contributor.referee
RefereeRopinski, Timodc.contributor.referee
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-32215dc.identifier.doi
PPN1703715608dc.identifier.ppn
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-32277-7dc.identifier.urn
GNDVirtuelle Realitätdc.subject.gnd
GNDMensch-Maschine-Kommunikationdc.subject.gnd
FacultyFakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften, Informatik und Psychologieuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionInstitut für Medieninformatikuulm.affiliationSpecific
Grantor of degreeFakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften, Informatik und Psychologieuulm.thesisGrantor
DCMI TypeTextuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
University Bibliographyjauulm.unibibliographie


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