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AuthorPollatos, Olgadc.contributor.author
AuthorMatthias, Ellendc.contributor.author
AuthorKeller, Johannesdc.contributor.author
Date of accession2020-07-02T07:56:25Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2020-07-02T07:56:25Zdc.date.available
Date of first publication2015-06-15dc.date.issued
AbstractSocial exclusion affects mental and physical health. The ability to regulate emotional responses to social exclusion is therefore essential for our well-being. As individual differences in detecting bodily signals (interoceptive sensitivity, IS) have been associated with the ability of emotion regulation, we aimed at exploring whether IS fosters coping with social exclusion and flexibility in emotion regulation. The first study investigated subjective feelings and behavioral affiliation tendencies in response to ostracism using a cyberball paradigm. Sixty-nine participants were assessed who differed with respect to IS. The second study examined habitual emotion regulation processes focusing on suppression and reappraisal as well as IS in 116 participants. Main results were that the effect of ostracism on distress and behavioral affiliation tendencies were qualified by IS—being ostracized had less impact on participants with stronger IS. Furthermore, Study 2 revealed that IS was associated with habitually stronger emotion regulation strategies. We conclude that having access to bodily signals helps (IS) reducing aversive states provoked by social exclusion, probably due to the fact that IS is associated with emotion regulation strategies.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
LicenseCC BY 4.0 Internationaldc.rights
Link to license texthttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/dc.rights.uri
KeywordInteroceptive sensitivitydc.subject
KeywordOstracismdc.subject
KeywordEmotion regulationdc.subject
KeywordEmbodied cognitiondc.subject
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 150 / Psychologydc.subject.ddc
LCSHInteroceptiondc.subject.lcsh
LCSHExile (Punishment)dc.subject.lcsh
LCSHSelf-controldc.subject.lcsh
LCSHSocial isolationdc.subject.lcsh
MeSHEmotional Regulationdc.subject.mesh
TitleWhen interoception helps to overcome negative feelings caused by social exclusiondc.title
Resource typeWissenschaftlicher Artikeldc.type
SWORD Date2019-12-19T17:54:29Zdc.date.updated
VersionpublishedVersiondc.description.version
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-32214dc.identifier.doi
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-32276-2dc.identifier.urn
GNDInterozeptiondc.subject.gnd
GNDEmotionsregulationdc.subject.gnd
GNDEmbodimentdc.subject.gnd
FacultyFakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften, Informatik und Psychologieuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionInstitut für Psychologie und Pädagogikuulm.affiliationSpecific
Peer reviewjauulm.peerReview
DCMI TypeCollectionuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
DOI of original publication10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00786dc.relation1.doi
Source - Title of sourceFrontiers in Psychologysource.title
Source - Place of publicationFrontiers Media S.A.source.publisher
Source - Volume6source.volume
Source - Year2015source.year
Source - Article number786source.articleNumber
Source - eISSN1664-1078source.identifier.eissn
Open AccessDOAJ Gold, Green Publisheduulm.OA
WoS000356943500001uulm.identifier.wos
University Bibliographyjauulm.unibibliographie
University Bibliographyjauulm.unibibliographie


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CC BY 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY 4.0 International