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AuthorRespondek, Lisadc.contributor.author
Date of accession2020-01-23T13:42:22Zdc.date.accessioned
Available in OPARU since2020-01-23T13:42:22Zdc.date.available
Year of creation2019dc.date.created
Date of first publication2020-01-23dc.date.issued
AbstractHigh dropout rates within tertiary education worldwide document challenges students have to overcome in order to succeed (e.g., OECD, 2012). For instance, they have to uphold motivation for the long term (e.g., Robbins et al., 2004). Thereby, one relevant motivational aspect is the subjective perception of control over one’s own academic outcomes, or in other words, perceived academic control (e.g., Perry, 1991). Particularly freshman students who are required to adjust to a new learning setting of university may ‘feel out of control’ (e.g., Perry et al., 2001). Unfortunately, the long-term relevance of perceived academic control remains unknown. Besides motivational aspects, the tertiary educational challenges trigger various achievement emotions (e.g., Pekrun & Stephens, 2010), which have impact themselves on students’ grades (e.g., Pekrun et al., 2017) and interact with perceived academic control (e.g., Pekrun, 2006). Thereby, experiences of achievement emotions depend on the habitual tendency (trait) and the situational impact (state, e.g., Nett et al., 2017). Overall, the aim of the present dissertation was to provide insight into the relevance of perceived academic control for undergraduate academic success, under the consideration of achievement emotions. In order to accomplish this aim, three scientific studies were conducted. Methodically, those studies used two field-based longitudinal datasets to achieve high external validity. They were obtained within the everyday student life of various study majors at Ulm University. The tow field-based datasets were an experience sampling study with 98 participants and an annual questionnaire with 1009 participants. Here, established scales were used (Pekrun et al., 2011; Perry et al., 2001). Overall from a statistical perspective, this dissertation used structural equation modelling approaches including moderated mediations (Study I), stable trait autoregressive trait state models (Study II), and a latent change score model combined with a discrete time survival analysis (Study III). The first research objective focused on the relation of PAC and academic success. Thereby Study III acknowledged a rather long-term and small negative change in undergraduate university PAC. Further, the reduction of university dropout intention (Study I) and dropout behaviour (Study III) through high or increasing PAC were addressed and Study III emphasized the positive effect of PAC on grades and vice versa. The second research objective focused on achievement emotions and their relevance for academic success. Thereby Study II broadened the trait-state debate of achievement emotions. Study I acknowledged the relevance of trait achievement emotions for dropout intention and Study II emphasized the relevance of rather stable variance components of the current negative emotional experience on grades. The third research objective focused on the triad of PAC, achievement emotions, and academic success. Study I acknowledged the partial reciprocal relations between PAC and achievement emotions, particularly for negative emotions such as anxiety or anger. Study II showed partially how PAC influences achievement emotions, which subsequently influences PAC and grades. In sum, the long-term decrease of perceived academic control broadens prior research by showing its relevance for late dropout, mediated by grades, and long-term reciprocal relations with achievement (Weiner, 1985, 2018). However, the results reveal the need for action regarding supporting at-risk students who may dropout or potential poor achievers mostly for freshman students, particularly as the present study indicates a possible over-estimation (e.g., Ruthig et al., 2007) or missing causal search (e.g., Stupnisky et al., 2011). Further, the present dissertation adds previous experiences as a third emotional variance component which is relevant for students’ grades and possibly for explaining how state becomes trait through new statistical analysis for experience sampling data. Additionally, the present dissertation questions the long-term impact of emotions on achievement and takes a first step to analyze their impact on dropout. Overall, this dissertation highlights the contribution of perceived academic control to the known relevance of motivation for academic success (e.g., Bean & Eaton, 2001; Heublein et al., 2017; Robbins et al., 2004) and provides a framework for future research, namely the PACES model.dc.description.abstract
Languageendc.language.iso
PublisherUniversität Ulmdc.publisher
Articles in publ.Respondek, L., Seufert, T., & Nett, U. E. (2019). Adding previous experiences to the person-situation debate of achievement emotions. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 58, 19-32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2019.02.004dc.relation.haspart
Articles in publ.Respondek, L., Seufert, T., Hamm, J. M., & Nett, U. E. (2019). Linking changes in perceived academic control to university dropout and university grades: A longitudinal approach. Journal of Educational Psychology. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/edu0000388dc.relation.haspart
LicenseStandarddc.rights
Link to license texthttps://oparu.uni-ulm.de/xmlui/license_v3dc.rights.uri
KeywordUniversity successdc.subject
KeywordUniversity dropoutdc.subject
KeywordAchievement emotionsdc.subject
KeywordPerceived academic controldc.subject
Dewey Decimal GroupDDC 150 / Psychologydc.subject.ddc
LCSHCollege dropoutsdc.subject.lcsh
LCSHAcademic achievementdc.subject.lcsh
LCSHMotivation in educationdc.subject.lcsh
TitleThe relevance of perceived academic control and achievement emotions for undergraduate academic successdc.title
Resource typeDissertationdc.type
Date of acceptance2019-12-06dcterms.dateAccepted
RefereeNett, Ulrikedc.contributor.referee
RefereeSeufert, Tinadc.contributor.referee
RefereeLeutner, Detlevdc.contributor.referee
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.18725/OPARU-24366dc.identifier.doi
PPN1688526684dc.identifier.ppn
URNhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bsz:289-oparu-24429-9dc.identifier.urn
GNDStudienerfolgdc.subject.gnd
GNDStudienabbruchdc.subject.gnd
GNDSchulerfolgdc.subject.gnd
GNDMotivationdc.subject.gnd
FacultyFakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften, Informatik und Psychologieuulm.affiliationGeneral
InstitutionInstitut für Psychologie und Pädagogikuulm.affiliationSpecific
Grantor of degreeFakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften, Informatik und Psychologieuulm.thesisGrantor
DCMI TypeTextuulm.typeDCMI
CategoryPublikationenuulm.category
University Bibliographyjauulm.unibibliographie


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